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freelancing tips

I can smell your excuse from here

Once upon a week ago, I got a YouTube comment from a student of mine:

“Really? I made 35k on Upwork in the last 12 months. Seems like a good scam to me :)”

This was in response to the typical loser-screech of the Upwork haters that come out of the woodwork every time I do an Upwork video… calling Upwork a scam or whatever the excuse-word of the day is.

Then, some dingbat responds to her with this doosie:

“35k on Upwork? That’s because you’re a woman, you’re privileged and people pay you more.”

Lol.

The excuse-gerbil is spinning at maximum speed on that one. It sort of reminds me of all the excuses people make about why they can’t become a developer. Not smart enough or not “techie” enough (whatever the hell THAT is).

When, really it’s just about persistence.

And, hard work.

And, a little belief in yourself.

You can whine about everyone else and their “privileges” all you want. At the end of the day, nobody cares and it won’t change anything. You’ll be right where you are. And, they’ll be right where they are.

That or get off your arse and make it happen.

Anyway, for a lot of new freelancers, the problem with Upwork is they just don’t understand how it actually works. That it’s an algorithm-driven platform with very specific goals. And, that despite is “propaganda”, the client is king on Upwork.

But, once you do get that stuff.

Understand what its goals are.

And, how its algorithms work to support those goals.

Tweaking your profile and your bidding strategy to manipulate those algorithms in YOUR favor becomes obvious.

And, Upwork can become your little piggy bank.

Anyway, that’s what I teach you in my freelancing on Upwork course here: https://skl.sh/2EhufQC

But, fair warning… leave your stinky excuses at the door.

Ain’t nobody got no time for that s!@#.

Later,

John​​​​​​​

November 24, 2018

The freelance nobody wants to hear

There are no secrets. There is no magic. The keys to success as a freelancer are boring, non-sexy and deadly effective… once you know them. Watch the video to learn them:

Later,

John

November 20, 2018

The best freelance websites for beginners

This is not some massive list of sites.

I just don’t think that’s all that helpful. Instead it’s 3 specific sites and process for starting and growing as a freelancer and USING the sites to encourage that growth. So, if you’re looking to get started freelancing, watch this:

And, I’d appreciate if you’d share it with any other new freelancers you know.

Later,

John

November 13, 2018

How to get clients for web development

I learned this when my brother got into insurance.

It was all but required for any new insurance agent and the primary way they went about drumming up those first few clients and building the network they’d use to reliably get clients the rest of their career.

Going around with him…

I quickly learned how hot a commodity I was as a web developer.

And, had people asking me to build them websites from day one.

It was easy to see why every insurance agent did this.

Anyway, that’s #4 of the 5 tips I reveal in my latest video on how to get clients for web development. If you wanna get paid to do this, but don’t necessarily wanna work for “the man”… give it a watch:

And, I’d appreciate it if you’d share it with any developers you know.

Later,

John

November 7, 2018

The biggest mistakes freelancers make

Man! I’ve made a lot of mistakes in my freelance career. But, each time, I always learned something important that helped me be successful later on.

But, these three.

These three mistakes were the biggest lessons I learned in 14+ years of freelancing. So, I made this video to just tell you what they are and what to do to avoid them. Give it a watch here:

And, I’d appreciate if you’d share it with any freelancers you know.

Later,

John

November 2, 2018

How to start working as a freelancer

FYI. I just uploaded a video with step-by-step instructions on how to start and grow your very own freelance business:

Please share with anyone you know who is interested in freelancing.

Later,

John

October 29, 2018

What working with Inc. magazine taught me about freelancing

Wanna sell your freelance services a lot easier?

I mean without feeling like a sleezeball?

Without needing to read 1000 books and become a sales genius?

Quick story…

The project I worked on for Inc. Magazine, I worked for this guy named Lewis. He was some kind of director at the company. I can’t remember exactly what, but he had quite a few people who worked for him.

He’d written several books.

One big best-seller, if I remember right.

Dude was a heavyweight.

And, he didn’t take any s!@#. I remember the first meeting we had. I don’t think I’ve been asked “why” that many times by all my other clients combined. And, it continued throughout the entire project.

He NEVER just took my word for it.

I had to explain every little thing.

But, he wasn’t a d!@# about it.

When I gave him a good reason, he accepted it and we moved on it. When I didn’t, we dug in and figured it out. And, by the end of the project, I felt like we both had a lot of mutual respect for each other.

And, it taught me a lot.

About how to be believable when talking with clients. How to generate trust not just with WHAT you say, but HOW you say it. And, I took what I learned there and applied it to selling my freelance services.

That’s a big part of why I got to work with Michael Hyatt.

And, Lewis Howes.

And, all these other heavyweights.

TRUST.

The people I worked with trusted me to work on these projects.

So, selling your services isn’t about some slick presentation or fancy sales “triggers” or gimmicks or whatever phrase the Twitter-heads use these days. It’s about trust. And, establishing it quickly with people who know very little about you.

Anyway, I reveal what I learned in lesson 6 of my new freelancing course.

How to be more believable in everything you say…

So, clients just “feel” like you’re trustworthy…

And, you get hired a helluva a lot easier.

So, you can get to the point where you’re not struggling or hoping and wishing to get clients each month. Instead, you have a backlog of clients. And, you can pick and choose who you work with and what you charge.

I know you can get there.

But, you gotta learn how to be convincing and believable.

To push more clients over the hump to hiring you.

Anyway, you can get access to the course for free over on SkillShare. As a teacher, I can give you an exclusive 2-month free trial. You get FULL access to all the courses on the site, including mine. Then, just take the course.

Cancel any time before the 2 months is up.

And, you never pay a dime.

Simple.

Anyway, link to get started is here: https://skl.sh/2pOiF5g

Later,

John

October 26, 2018

The best freelancing advice you’ll hear

This from the Joelsuf-inator:

“One thing I’ve discovered is that doing this DOES require the same kind of productivity as a full time job. Just because you’re making money from home does not mean you can just cut your commitment levels in half. In many cases you should be tripling your commitment. I’m discovering this now. Sure I can pick anytime during the day to work, but I better be productive for 8-12 hours a day like with any kind of job. Separate learning from marketing from doing work.”

I literally can’t say it better.

As sure as the Earth ain’t flat…

If you follow this advice, you’ll eventually succeed.

I can’t tell you how many freelancers I’ve talked to who get into it thinking they’re gonna work 4 hours a day, right from the start, and make more than they did working their 9 to 5.

You can get there.

But, not until you’ve put in years of work.

Building your reputation.

Upping your prices.

Honing your execution.

Getting to that point requires you to be willing to put in triple the effort. This is why I say, for most people, freelancing is either in your DNA or it’s not. Some people hear what I just said and think:

“Why the hell would I do that?”

Others are so allergic to a 9 to 5…

They say:

“Whatever it takes.”

If you’re the latter, heed Sir Joelsuf’s advice.

And, you almost can’t lose.

Now, the caveat here is making sure all that hard work is actually productive. If you’re gonna run 100mph, make sure you’re headed in the right direction. Otherwise, you’re running yourself ragged for nothing.

And, as you know, that’s what my Beginner’s Guide to Freelance course is for.

It’s the map.

The big mile markers along the way to get you to a REAL business around your freelance services. So, you can methodically build it to the point you can work as much or as little as you want.

Make as much or as little as you want.

And, ensure all your hard work pays off.

In any case, you can get access to it for nothing over on SkillShare.

All the details on that are here: https://skl.sh/2pOiF5g

Later,

John

October 24, 2018

I got a few freelance clients, now I’m stuck

This is that turning point I keep bringing up:

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You get a little taste of success.

But, really don’t know how.

Then, all of sudden, it stops.

And, all the fears… all the doubts and insecurities, all the “why me” and “can’t ONE thing just f!@#ing work!?”… the nightmares about being stuck in a 9 to 5 forever, all the people saying, “I told you so”.

You bounce from depressed to pissed to confused…

This is the moment you decide to get serious…

Or, walk away.

THIS is what I mean by building a real business around your freelancing services. KNOWING how you got those clients. KNOWING how to get more. KNOWING you don’t have to worry about that ever again.

So, the solution?

How do you do it?

You saw my answer, right?

THAT is a start.

I’ll keep quoting him until people stop asking me:

“If you’re not producing content online, you basically don’t exist.”

— Gary Vaynerchuk

But, most freelancers will find an excuse not to.

¯\_(ツ)_/¯

What do you do?

Of course, that’s just a start. Freelancers are service providers. And, that industry is well-established. What works is well-established. You don’t have to guess. You don’t have to wonder. You just have to learn it then DO it.

Repeat clients.

Referrals.

Service quality.

On and on down the list… it’s all known.

Anyway, THAT is what I teach you in my new Beginner’s Guide to Freelance course. All the things we KNOW work that most freelancers just simply refuse to do. And, if you do them… long-term, you can’t lose.

So, if you’ve reached that point…

Where it’s time to quit f!@#ing around…

And, time to get serious.

Get started learning what works here: https://skl.sh/2pOiF5g

Later,

John

October 22, 2018

How to get freelance clients when you’re new to freelancing

1000 things you could do here…

But, let me tell you what I actually did.

First… my first several clients all hired me because they’d seen some YouTube videos I did that were pretty close to what they wanted. At the time, I didn’t have a portfolio up, testimonials or even a page selling my services.

They just found my email and emailed me.

This is why I constantly beat the “create content” drum.

It can work when you have nothing else.

Second… all the projects I worked on were small.

Fix a CSS bug here. Write a little PHP script there. Frankly, I wasn’t ready for big projects and I didn’t have the “proof” to justify hiring me for one. But, little scripts and fixes weren’t a big deal.

And, that helped me BUILD my portfolio, etc.

Third… my portfolio.

One thing, I learned quickly is your portfolio is the #1 things clients will look at/ask for. I was able to get work despite not having one, because of my content. But, I’d have landed a lot more jobs if I had one.

So, this is why I developed the “non-client portfolio”.

Build 5-10 websites/applications for nobody.

Purely to put in your portfolio.

Having something in there is better than nothing. They don’t need to be client projects. Clients want to see examples of your work, at a bare minimum. And, just make sure it’s your best work and visually appealing.

So, if I were starting today, here’s what I’d do:

  1. Build a portfolio of non-client sites/apps in 1-2 weeks.
  2. Start creating YouTube videos solving small tech problems.
  3. At the end of every video, point people to my “hire me” page.
  4. Spend 30/month promoting my YouTube videos on Google Ads.

It’s pretty simple actually.

Then, if you want to know how to grow your freelance business from there, that’s what I’ll teach you in my new Beginner’s Guide to Freelance course. And, you can get access to it for nothing over on SkillShare.

All the details on that are here: https://skl.sh/2pOiF5g

Later,

John

October 21, 2018

Is freelancing income feast or famine?

The #1 question I get from people who WANT to get into freelancing.

But, it’s interesting because 63% of people who DO freelance believe that a diversified portfolio of clients is MORE stable than a single employer. To me, it comes down to HOW you do it.

So, I decided to do a video and explain that.

If you’ve thought about getting into freelancing, but have been worried about the income stability, THIS is the video you should watch:

Later,

John

October 19, 2018

Is this the turning point in YOUR freelance career?

There’s a moment in every Freelancer’s career.

You’ve got a few clients…

Things seem to be going well.

But, you’re not really sure how it all happened. You’re not making quite enough to feel comfortable. And, you can’t help but worry, constantly, about what happens if you lose one of our clients… and can’t get another.

It’s a turning point.

Figure it out and you go onto a successful freelance career.

Don’t and you get stuck… unable to grow.

Eventually, most give up.

For me, it was “the hockey guy”.

A hockey training membership site I’d built for a guy. He was the client that  put more over the top. I’d nudged into the 6-figure range and, honestly, felt like it was all built on a house of cards.

Because, I had almost no idea how I’d done it.

I’d just kind of got the clients.

And, I had no real idea how or why.

I just kept imagining it all falling apart and there being nothing I could do about it. I obsessed over it. And, my anxiety was through the roof 24/7. I remember thinking, “This is supposed to be a GOOD thing. Why does it feel so awful?”

Anyway, it ended up being good for me.

Because, it drove me to dig deeper.

​​​​​​​And, actually figure out what was working… and WHY.

That led me to go from charging 50/hour to 100/hour. To get rid of some clients that were dragging me down. To get a lot more pro-active in my “client-getting”. And, to reach a point where I was getting 30+ project offers/month.

I got one from a well-known internet market named Ryan Lee that I turned down.

Another from Leslie Samuel from Social Media Examiner.

It put me in a lot stronger position.

With a lot more peace of mind and certainty.

Because now I actually KNEW what I was doing.

And, it all came from just taking the time to dig in and really learn how to market, how to get clients and how to build a REAL freelance business that wasn’t beholden to “luck” or change or any freelancing platform.

If that’s the kind of thing you’re after…

Then maybe THIS is the kick in the pants you need…

To turn that corner and get serious.

Anyway, what I learned during that time is what I cover in my new Beginner’s Guide to Freelance course. The big rocks. The chess moves to make to methodically build your freelance business with certainty.

You can get access to it for nothing over on SkillShare.

All the details on that are here: https://skl.sh/2pOiF5g

Later,

John

October 18, 2018

When a freelance client questions what you charge

This is a really good question from Jeenie:

2018-10-17_1301

Two things:

First… and, I know, I know… “that’s what you ALWAYS say”.

That’s because it’s true.

It goes back to selling on value. The value you offer to a client should be MORE than time saved. The expertise you bring to the table. The quality of work. The reassurance it’s being done right.

A whole host of “value-added” benefits beyond time saved.

So, sure…

Maybe, her client could do it themselves in 15 minutes.

But, will it be done right?

Will it be done to the same level of quality?

Will the client know to do X and not Y?

And, to be clear… it’s not just about telling the client this. It’s about actually doing it as a part of the service you offer. If your only benefit is you’ll save them time, you’re going to have a hard time as a freelancer.

It HAS to be more.

Second thing is this…

Walk away.

Or, at least, make sure your client knows you will. From my own experience, all but one of the first group of clients I got… eventually moved on as I raised prices. Just that one stayed as I went from 25/hour to ultimately 100/hour.

Sometimes, there’s a direct conflict between holding onto a client…

And, what you can make as a freelancer.

Is that client really worth you not making what you want?

You only have so many hours in a day.

Maximize them.

And, if you have to let go of a client to do it… then, let them go.

Now, of course, that only really works if you have a new client, willing to pay your increased rate, to replace them. And, this is why I focus so much on teaching freelancers how to get clients.

It needs to be your top skill.

Because, when you can get clients at will.

When you have a backlog of people wanting to hire you.

It’s easier to move on…

And, you’re less likely to put up with this stuff.

In any case, that’s what my new freelancing course is all about. Teaching you how to methodically build your freelance business over the next month, year, 5 years… and create a REAL business around your services.

And, you can get access to it for nothing on SkillShare.

All the details on that are here: https://skl.sh/2pOiF5g

Later,

John

October 17, 2018

Most freelancers REFUSE to learn this

This is probably the hardest thing to convince freelancers of:

2018-10-16_0819

​​​​​​It’s such a mindset shift.

I think most freelancers, understandably, are a bit desperate when they start out. Hell, I was. I was trying to leave a 9-to-5 I hated. I was looking for something to just “work” and help me escape.

And, I’d have begged clients if I had to.

So, I get it.

And, frankly, early on…

You probably should work with clients who don’t pay well…

And, are awful to work with.

You just need experience… any experience almost.

But, if you really wanna make the next step in your freelance career and go from getting paid to getting paid WELL… at some point, you have to become disciplined in how you deal with clients.

Your mindset has to change.

And so, if a client is underbidding a project…

And, you tell them so…

And, you sell them on value.

And, their response is “F!@# off” and they decline the proposal.

Good!

You just saved yourself a massive headache. In fact, most of the time I wouldn’t even bother to bid on projects that are way underbid. Those generally aren’t going to be the clients you wanna work with.

Of course, that’s all hard to do when you’re desperate for clients.

Never knowing where the next one will come from.

If they’ll pay well.

Will they be a pain in the arse.

The trick is to get so much incoming work that you literally can’t work with them all. And, you have to pick and choose who you’re going to work with. THAT’S when your mindset will change.

THAT’S when you become picky.

And, THAT’S when you’ll start making even more as a freelancer.

Anyway, that’s also what my new freelancing course will help you do. How to figure out what (high-paying) services to offer as a freelancer. How to find clients who will hire you for those services. How to get referrals. Repeat clients. And more.

And, you can get access to it for nothing over on SkillShare.

Details on all that are here: https://skl.sh/2pOiF5g

Later,

John

October 16, 2018

Success really is simple sometimes

Take this comment I just got:

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You ever heard the saying: “success leaves clues”.

It’s true.

And, sometimes, success slaps you in the face on a daily basis and implores you to pay attention. To quit using “being skeptical” as an excuse to really just stay comfortable. To get serious about your life and your career.

There’s plenty of complicated things in life.

Relationships.

Kids (oh boy!)

Rocket astro-surgery.

But, this isn’t one of those things. The people who take the time to learn how systems like Upwork operate and put in the effort to take advantage of those systems tend to have success… and have success quickly.

And, just imagine what happens…

When the #1 freelancing platform on the planet turns in YOUR favor.

Or, don’t imagine… and instead see it for yourself.

Learn how it works here: https://skl.sh/2EhufQC

Later,

John

October 15, 2018

Is freelancing worth it?

I guess I’m just an a-hole.

My problem was always the other people I worked with. In particular, my boss. I just couldn’t work for someone I knew I was clearly smarter than and have to swallow my pride and run with all their dumb ideas.

Like I said… a-hole.

So, I’ve always known I had to be my own boss.

I’d go insane otherwise.

But, I always believed this naive notion that if I worked hard, did good work and did right by people, things would work out. My employers would see that and I’d be rewarded for it.

That notion got shattered in a hotel room in NYC.

After, I’d just watched one of my employers make a pile of money that I was largely responsible for helping him make… and I didn’t get a penny. In fact, my work was never even mentioned and instead I held doors and passed out cookies.

That’s why I freelance.

And, it’s been worth every second.

But, just statistically, it makes more sense, too. Freelancers, globally make more on average than wage workers (39k vs 18k). And, they have more job security (63% believe having multiple client is more secure than 1 employer).

Sure, it takes some work.

And, there’s a learning curve.

But, ONCE you get it…

There’s no looking back.

And, you have 100% control of your own destiny. You’re not beholden to some tech-bro CEO at a startup or some stodgy, old company whose CEO can barely open their email. It’s all on you.

And, that’s best security I know of.

In any case, it’s not for everybody. But, if you’re tired of your 9-5 or you know you’ll never survive in that world, freelancing is a great way to build your own business and be your own boss.

And, my new freelancing course will teach you how to freelance successfully.

And, you can get access to for nothing over on SkillShare.

All the details on that are here: https://skl.sh/2pOiF5g

Later,

John

October 12, 2018

NEW course: Beginner’s Guide to Freelance

Just posted a new course.

It’s called the Beginner’s Guide to Freelance and it’s teaching you everything I’ve learned from 10+ years of freelancing to help you get started, grow and be your own boss. Here’s what you’ll learn in the course:

  • How to figure out what services to offer
  • How to make money AND do what you love
  • How to find people WILLING to hire you
  • How to sell your services without having to become some sales genius or slime ball
  • How to build your freelance business as a sustainable business you can sell or hand to your kids and grandkids
  • And, ultimately, be YOUR OWN boss and control YOUR OWN destiny.

This course is for you if you’re an absolute beginner, tired of working a 9-to-5 you hate and are ready to make the leap into freelancing. It’ll show you how to methodically build and grow your freelance business.

Anyway, you can get it for nothing over on SkillShare.

Link to get started is here: https://skl.sh/2pOiF5g

Later,

John

P.S. If you’re a patron over on Patreon, you can get it here: https://www.patreon.com/posts/beginners-guide-21994444

October 11, 2018

How to find the GOOD jobs on Upwork

I get this one a lot.

It’s the most common refrain from the “Upwork is a SCAAAAAAM!” folks that troll my YouTube channel. But, there’s also some well-meaning folks who just haven’t learned how to do this, yet.

Anyway, there’s a simple way to weed out all the junk projects on Upwork and get to the good, high-paying jobs… with clients that are easy to work with.

First, log into your Upwork account and run a search for your niche:

2018-10-08_0929

Then, click the “Filters” button. A list of filters you can apply will drop down:

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At a minimum, I recommend setting the “Client History”, “Client Info” and “Budget” filters. You want clients who’ve hired other freelancers and have their payment method verified.

NOTE: before a client can pay you, they HAVE to have their payment method verified. So, clients who don’t have that… can’t pay you.

I then, also, look for projects in my desired budget range:

2018-10-08_0933

Notice that the number of projects went from 1,644 to 669.

That’s still a massive amount of jobs.

And, for what I do, I only need maybe 1-2 per month.

So, I have a hard time when people tell me there are no “good jobs” on Upwork. In MY niche, there’s more than I could ever hope to even BID on, let alone get hired for.

Of course, FINDING these jobs is one thing… now, you need to get hired for them. I see a lot of people who have their opinions on this…

But, I see very few who will tell you THE most important thing…

Which is, your opinion doesn’t mean jack.

That it’s not about some sales tactic or how you write your proposals or what “order” a client sees your proposal in. I mean yeah… pay attention to those things.

But, they don’t mean squat if you don’t know what the CLIENT wants.

You can be the smoothest talker in the world, but if you’re not speaking the client’s language, it won’t matter and you’ll struggle to get hired.

The good thing is clients will TELL you exactly what they want. You just gotta know how to look for it AND prioritize what matters to them most, second most, etc.

Anyway, I show you how to do that in Lesson 6 of Module 3 in my Freelancing on Upwork course. I truly believe it’s the single most important thing you can learn about writing proposals on Upwork (or anywhere for that matter)… because it removes all the guesswork.

You’ll know exactly what to say and your proposals will have much greater impact.

In any case, you can get access to the course for nothing on SkillShare.

All the details on how to do that are here: https://skl.sh/2OIxQrO

Later,

John

October 8, 2018

How to build a freelance portfolio that’ll get you hired (even if you have no past client history)

Your portfolio may be the most important part of your freelancing profile. It’s the thing that concretely PROVES (or not) that you know what you’re doing.

But, it needs to be built a certain way, otherwise it can actually work AGAINST you.

First is visual appeal. Take these stats for instance:

  • When people hear information, they’re likely to remember only 10% of that information three days later. However, if a relevant image is paired with that same information, people retained 65% of the information three days later.
  • Eye-tracking studies show internet readers pay close attention to information-carrying images. In fact, when the images are relevant, readers spend more time looking at the images than they do reading text on the page.
  • People following directions with text and illustrations do 323% better than people following directions without illustrations.
  • Tweets with images receive 150% more retweets than tweets without images.

I know… shocker.

Adding images makes things perform better. But, I’m always baffled by freelancer profiles. A lot of freelancers don’t properly prioritize visual appeal. Your portfolio HAS to look good. Even if, you’re in an industry that lacks it (writers, back-end development, etc).

One way to accomplish that, of course, is to make sure you always build nice-looking things.

But, again, that can be tough in some industries.

One trick I see being used a lot more lately is using “graphical representations” instead of screenshots. Take this graphic for Infusionsoft, for example:

2018-10-07_1120

This is obviously not what the actual interface looks like. But, it gives the impression that it is. And, it communicates the point.

So, get creative with your portfolio. Don’t tie yourself to having to just take screenshots. If you’re a writer, use the graphics from the websites or books you’ve written for. If you’re a back-end developer, show the front-end result. Use graphics instead of screenshots, if necessary.

But, PRIORITIZE visual appeal.

The second big thing is your portfolio needs to function AS proof.

I talked about how to inject proof into your profile overview in this article. It’s critical. But, when you mention projects you’ve worked on in your overview, clients will immediately go to your portfolio to SEE those projects. So, make sure anything you mention in your overview is visually represented in your portfolio.

I’m telling you as sure as I’m sitting here… if you combine that 1-2 punch (overview and portfolio) in the way I outline… clients will stop and give you a hard look.

And, you’ll make a very compelling case.

And, over time, my experience is you’ll win a lot more jobs.

Of course, the big objection I get at this point is…

I don’t have past clients to put in a portfolio.

And, it IS tricky when you first get started. It’s hard to get work without a portfolio, but you can’t build a portfolio without work. And, the main advice you’ll hear is to do FREE work.

That’s fine, but it’s actually not necessary.

There’s a simple (and quicker) way to build your portfolio that doesn’t require doing a bunch of free work for people who often end up being a pain in the a!@ to work with.

I show you what that is in Module 2, Lesson 6 of my Freelancing on Upwork course on SkillShare.

And, you can get access to that course for nothing.

All the details on that are here: https://skl.sh/2OIxQrO

Later,

John

October 7, 2018

The one thing your Upwork profile overview MUST have

There’s actually three.

And, an exact order to put them in.

But, THIS is definitely the most important.

Thing is…

Most clients on Upwork aren’t looking at just YOUR proposal or profile. I mean, you’ve seen this. There’s often 20, 30 or even more proposals on any good job on Upwork. So, they’re sifting through dozens of freelancers.

And, it’s silly to think they’re doing some kind of in-depth technical analysis.

People don’t make decisions that way.

They skim through things rapidly…

And, try to “get a feel”…

Or, look for something that JUMPS out at them.

And, if they click through to your profile, the first thing they’ll see and likely read is your profile overview. Of course, you have about 3 seconds to grab their attention otherwise they’ll move on.

So, you have hit them hard in those first few seconds.

But, you also have to remember that this is a marketplace.

They are there to buy.

So, a lot of the typical marketing advice doesn’t apply.

Telling a story and all that.

They’re past that.

So, what do you hit them with?

PROOF.

But, as soon as I say that a lot of freelancers immediately think of their portfolio.

Or, aren’t sure how to put proof into an overview.

So, let me give you an example:

“Hi, I’m John. You might know me from my work on Tim Ferriss’ 4-Hour Body website, or the site I built for Inc. Magazine, maybe my work on Michael Hyatt’s Platform University or the membership sites I’ve built for Lewis Howes.”

Now, that opening may or may not hit YOU.

But, I know my market.

These people are legends in my market.

I’ve literally had clients say to me:

“I saw you worked with XYZ person. If they trust you, I trust you.”​​​​​​​

That Tim Ferris 4-Hour Body line grabs them by the eyeballs…

And, makes them read.

But, also establishes credibility, authority and, ultimately, TRUST. So, NOW, they’ll actually believe what you say in the rest of profile overview. They’ll rush to your portfolio to SEE what you built for these people.

And, you’re 90% of the way to getting hired…

Because you made them STOP…

And, pay attention to you.

THAT is how you cut through the 30 other proposals.

Now, the big objection I get here is:

“I don’t have those past clients. I can’t do that.”

Mmmmm… I don’t know. You don’t need huge names like that. You don’t need even need past clients, per se. You just need proof that you know what you’re doing. So, “11 years at a web design shop” can work.

Hell, even “Top of my class at college” is better than nothing.

Point is…

Talk about what you’ve DONE.

Anything of note.

Even if you don’t think it’s that big of a deal.

And, if you literally have nothing OR you want to build up what you can put there, get out and do things. Work on projects. Work with clients… for free if you have to. That’s the thing about that Tim Ferriss project.

I didn’t get paid for it.

In the end, they moved away from WordPress…

And, the site I built got replaced.

But, I still built a site for Tim Ferriss.

Put it in there.

Anyway, like I said, this is 1 of the 3 things you need to include your profile overview. Once you have their attention and established credibility, now you need to lead them by the hand to hiring you.

And, that’s what the next two parts do.

I teach those in Lesson 4 of Module 2 in my Freelancing on Upwok course.

You can get access to it for nothing over on SkillShare.

All the details on that are here: https://skl.sh/2OIxQrO

Later,

John

October 6, 2018