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Learn to Code

Learning your first programming language… quickly

When I played high school basketball…

And, I wanted to become a better shooter… my coach and I spent hours analyzing film of the best shooters at the time. Hand placement, elbow position, follow-through, on and on.

Breaking them down.

Figuring out WHY they were so good.

You start to see trends.

When I first started learning copywriting… one of the pieces of advice I got was to take an ad I knew worked well and write it out by hand myself. It helped embed the flow of a good ad into your muscle memory.

And, again, you start to see trends.

You get a “feel” for what’s good and what’s not.

Sooooo…

What’s one of the best ways to learn a new programming language?

As John Sonmez says:

“I think the best place to start is by looking at the source code of an actual working application. It’s going to feel uncomfortable. You might not feel like you’re understanding anything. [That] is ok. By starting out this way, you are going to have a serious head start over most programmers who have no idea what the programming language they are trying to learn even looks like. It’s always a good idea to get a lay of the land before embarking on any journey. Programming is no different.”

Even better?

If you can get inside that programmer’s head and learn the reasons WHY they made the choices they did. It gives you a depth of understanding that’s hard to rival… and does more that just teach you “what to type”.

It imbues the “spirit” of that programmer into you.

To grow and adapt and make your own.

And, have your own point-of-view and perspective.

Which is what an artist is.

In any case, that’s been my goal with my teaching from the very beginning. That’s why I always say, “It’s less about the code…” It’s more about the why behind it and learning how to be an artist.

Someone unique.

Who can bring something new and fresh into the world.

Not just someone who can regurgitate a block of code…

With no real idea why it’s written the way it is.

Anyway, if you want to dive into PHP and MySQL, HTML, CSS, JavaScript and the like… in this way, then give my web development curriculum on Skillshare a look, because THAT is how I teach.

And, you can get access to all of it for free.

All the details on that are at: https://www.johnmorrisonline.com/skillshare

Later,

John

April 9, 2019

Do developers need a college degree?

“You don’t need college degree to be a web developer because people with advance college degree create libraries so that people without college degree can get a job.” 

That’s the comment I just got on YouTube.

🙄

Yeah.

Sooo… let’s tear this guy a new… ahem…

I mean, here are my thoughts:

Later,

John

November 19, 2018

How to become a full stack web developer

I don’t hear many developers talk about #4 here.

But, it’s so critical.

If you start your web development career by picking a language, you’re making it much harder on yourself. And, that’s what #4 in this video addresses:

In any case, if you wanna know how to methodically become a full stack web developer, give it a watch. It’s my recommended path to make a lot fewer mis-steps and get there faster.

Later,

John

November 14, 2018

How to learn to code fast

It took my five years to learn PHP. It was my first language and I made a bunch of mistakes. Later, when I decided to learn jQuery, I fixed those mistakes and learned it in about 30 days.

In this video, I reveal what I learned:

If you wanna learn how to code as fast as you possibly can, give it a watch.

I’d appreciate if you’d share it with any developers you know, as well.

Later,

John

November 1, 2018

Ajax requests with jQuery.post()

This is one of the reasons I still like jQuery.

I’m sure all the new frameworks do similar stuff, but things like this are so simple with jQuery. Anyway, jQuery.post() is a shorthand Ajax function. It’s the equivalent of doing this:

$.ajax({
type: “POST”,
url: url,
data: data,
success: success,
dataType: dataType
});

So, with it, you can send an Ajax request this easily:

var posting = $.post(url, data);

Then, handle the response like this:

posting.done(function(data) {
// Handle data here
});

Or, all together like this:

$.post( “process.php”, function( data ) {
$( “.result” ).html( data );
});

It really is pretty simple.

Anyway, in my latest course I show you how to grab the form data from an HTML form, send it to a PHP script to be processed, generate a response in JSON and then handle that response in your jQuery to create an Ajax-powered quote request form on your website.

If you haven’t got into Ajax or jQuery, this is a good place to start because you get to see the whole request “loop” in a simple script that you can understand even if you’ve never done any of this before.

And, that’s along with learning about CSS Grid, CSS transitions, a little PHP and more.

Anyway, link to get no-cost access to the course here: https://skl.sh/2xM6Y3l

Later,

John

October 3, 2018

The fastest way to learn how to code

Taylor just reviewed my latest course on SkillShare:

“I’ve been a fan of John’s content on YouTube, but this was the first course of his I’ve taken and I’m really happy I did! I was familiar with all of the technologies used, but I’m stuck in ‘tutorial purgatory.’ I’m confident that I can build things, but I’m not confident that I can deliver professional results to clients. This course was a great way to work on a real project and gain some confidence and experience. I will be going through John’s OOP course soon. I highly recommend this course to anyone who is familiar with the technologies used and wants to put them together in a practical project.” –Taylor Wilkinson

This is why I’ve started doing more project-based courses recently. They’re not necessarily going to teach you the underlying languages in-depth (which is is why I was down on them before)…

BUT…

They’re very powerful when it comes to developing confidence.

In fact “build real things” is in my top 3 “things to do” to learn to code FAST.

So, if you couple language-specific courses…

With project-based courses like this.

That’s THE fastest way I know to get good quick.

Anyway, you can get access to my latest course for nothing over on SkillShare.

In it, you’ll learn how to submit form data using AJAX, how to build a responsive grid with CSS Grid, how to send a contact email using PHP, how to build a mobile menu using CSS transitions, how to build a website using HTML, CSS, jQuery and PHP and more.

All the details on that are here: https://skl.sh/2xM6Y3l

Later,

John

October 1, 2018

NEW COURSE: Build an AJAX-powered freelance website template

Just released a new project-based course.

In this one you’ll learn:

  • How to submit form data using AJAX
  • How to build a responsive grid with CSS Grid
  • How to send a contact email using PHP
  • How to build a mobile menu using CSS transitions
  • How to build a website using HTML, CSS, jQuery and PHP

And, plenty more.

Full source code is included.

You can get access to it for nothing here: https://skl.sh/2xM6Y3l

Later,

John

P.S. If you’re a Patreon supporter, you can access the course here: https://www.patreon.com/posts/21697046

September 28, 2018

Can I slap these entitled developers?

Got this comment recently:

“This peaks my curiosity. Lol….what do you mean really discovered it? On base or in the barracks? Also what type of WAN connectivity did they have in the early 2000s in the early stages of the Iraq War? Mostly satellite?”

This came from and email where I’d said:

“It was IN Iraq that I really discovered the internet… Online business… And, eventually web development.”

We did have internet in Iraq in 2004-2005…

As weird as that seems now looking back.

But, it definitely wasn’t great.

Satellite, I believe.

It actually wasn’t until about 3-4 months in, though. And, our “internet cafe” was some framed walls and plywood somebody built inside the warehouses we worked and lived in… old SCUD missile warehouses of Saddam’s.

There were maybe 5 or 10 computers.

The internet was slower than you can probably even fathom.

And, you could only get on in 30-minute intervals.

So, most days when I had free time, I’d stand in line for half an hour to an hour, when I finally did get on the computer, I spent the majority of my time waiting for pages to load. And then, I jump back in line for another hour to get back on.

That’s how I started learning web development.

And, of course…

No Lynda.

No Udemy.

No SkillShare.

Hell, YouTube didn’t even exist, yet.

Can you imagine that?

No YouTube!

So, that’s why I get a little grumpy when I hear developers, today, complain about how hard learning web development is. I sympathize… but only a little. It’s also why I believe if you truly want it, you don’t make excuses like that.

If you really want it…

You’ll crawl over hot coals to get there.

And, if you’re not willing to do that…

I question how much you actually want it.

But, that’s grumpy, old “uphill both ways to school” me.

Although, the truth is, today, you have an entire industry built to cater to helping you learn web development. You have people who will bend over backwards to help you get there. And, whatever you want to do… there’s somebody there to help.

So, there’s really no excuses.

Do you want it or don’t you?

Are you willing to work or aren’t you?

Are you committed or not?

That’s WHY this is the stuff I harp on.

Most everything else is irrelevant in the grand scheme of things.

Anyway, take it for what it’s worth. Some of you will get what I mean and realize how simple it all actually is. And, that can be liberating. But, of course, others will do the “I know” thing and sit there still doing nothing.

If you’re a doer, the way I help is my training curriculum…

PHP, OOP, HTML, CSS, freelancing… it’s all in there.

And, you can get access to lessons for absolutely nothing.

Just go to my FREE tutorial site here: https://www.johnsfreetuts.com

It IS work… no doubt.

But, like I said… no excuses.

It’s there waiting for you and won’t cost you a thing.

Soooooo…

¯\_(ツ)_/¯

Later,

John

September 25, 2018

You’re not smart enough to be a developer

This is one of the big fallacies in our industry.

For me, it was about six months in.

Growing up, I always knew I was pretty smart. School came easy to me. I could always learn new things really quickly. Plus, everybody always told me I was smart.

I just grew up knowing it.

Then, I started learning how to code.

And, it didn’t come easy.

In fact, even when I worked really hard at it, I still didn’t get it. The PHP manual is one I can remember. It’s weird to think about now.

But, it used to confuse the hell outta me.

To be honest, I’d got hired AS a developer…

Before I really, fully “got it”.

Which was scary as hell.

I felt like a complete fraud.

I remember telling myself at one point:

“Maybe, you’re not smart enough to be a developer.”

Then, one day, I was sitting in a hotel room… at a conference with my boss. And, he was asking me some questions about coding and how it worked.

Just general curiosity stuff.

And, for some reason, in that moment…

It clicked.

I can remember it clear as day.

I just suddenly “got it”

And, all this stuff started falling into place in my head.

Thing was, I hadn’t changed. I didn’t suddenly get 10X smarter. My I.Q. was exactly the same as it was before. But, my understanding… was radically different.

And, all it took was one moment…

For everything to click.

And, since I’ve started teaching others how to code, I’ve seen this time and time again. I get the excited emails from people and you can tell it just clicked for them.

Anyway what I’ve learned…

It’s really not about intelligence.

It’s more about persistence.

That “aha” moment comes not from some radical change in your intelligence, but from pushing and clawing and fighting to understand…

From grinding and learning…

And, stuffing as much info in your head as you can.

And, then, one day…

BOOM!

It all just clicks.

It re-orients itself inside your head.

And, it suddenly all makes sense.

So, the thing to do is NOT worry about if you’re smart enough and all those insecurities that can creep up. It’s to just keep working and learning…

And, building toward that moment.

Anyway, I’ve got a whole curriculum of developer training that can help you do that. Over 30 hours of training that you can get access to for nothing.

Details are here: https://www.skillshare.com/r/user/johnmorris

Later,

John

August 27, 2018