Close

web development

Gutenberg is a clunky, horrible mess

Spaketh the troll:

“The only thing laughable here is this smug, horrible take.

That’s what cracks me up.

Gutenberg is a clunky, horrible mess. I can see how the childish building block approach might appeal to an arrogant prick like yourself who believes that every sentence deserves a new line, but to real content creators who actually know how to write, it’s a nightmare. An actual blog, an actual article…something you clearly know nothing about, since you’re committed to this self-congratulatory “I’m smarter than everyone else” drivel you laughably call a blog.

I’m sure you’ll offer up some snarky reply about how it’s for developers and whatnot, forgetting that it’s also about the end-user and content creators. Of course, looking at what you’ve designed here, it’s clear that you don’t really know much about quality content or good design. More’s the pity.

In short, your take is bad, and you should feel bad. Sadly, you won’t. You’ll dismiss this as “hating”, just as you’ve dismissed all the valid criticisms of Gutenberg because, I don’t know, using it makes you feel special, important, and superior? I’m only guessing, but based on the attitude of this post and others you’ve made, I feel it’s a pretty accurate one. But hey, you do you, pal.”

–Troll

Oof!

The lady doth protest too much, methinks!

Anyway, notice how there’s no actual explanations here. No reason why. Just “it’s a clunky mess”. One bumbling line about “every sentences deserves a new line”… as if that has anything to do with Gutenberg.

Anyway, this is when you know you’re on the right track.

When, this is the best someone can up with.

Funniest thing is…

I guarantee this “real content creator” will be typing his blog posts in Gutenberg in less than a year from now. In fact, most of the Gutenberg “haters” will. It’s just how this stuff works.

Although, there probably still IS that one guy using Windows XP.

Anyhoo, t’aint no sweat off this gander’s back.

Keep using that clunky old editor if you like…

With your T9-enabled flip phone…

Riding your horse and buggy “into town ma”…

To pick up some spears and loin cloths…

Ok, ok… I digress.

Anyway, if you ain’t into all this debating and just want to dive into Gutenberg without having to learn “yet another piece of software” all on your own, my new Beginner’s Guide to Gutenberg course will show you everything you need to know.

And, access won’t cost you a buffalo nickel.

Deets on that are here: https://skl.sh/2AQpjNj

Later,

John​​​​​​​

December 9, 2018

Why you’ll fail as a freelancer

There’s lots of reasons:

  • You’re just not that good at what you do.
  • You’re not very good at dealing with people.
  • You picked the wrong market and services to offer.

I could go on and on.

But, by far, the #1 reason freelancers fail is they never learn how to consistently get clients. They rely on luck or “word of mouth”. They try this and that, but never learn and apply anything consistently.

They constantly worry that one day the clients will dry up.

And, if that does happen…

They have no idea how to fix it.

That was me the first few years of my freelancing career. I’d gotten a few clients by pure dumb luck. I’d picked a few up off Upwork. But, I really had no idea how. I didn’t know what to do to get more.

And, I clung to those clients like a vegan to her tofu.

And then, one of them decided to move on from me.

It was going to be a huge hit to my income.

And, I had no plan.

All the crazy thoughts kicked in. What if I never get another client? What if I can’t pay my bills? What if I have to go back to a regular job? What if my wife and kids see me as a failure?

On and on and on.

The silver lining is all that gave me the motivation to figure this out.

And, I did.

In fact, I built a system so powerful that I was turning away 4-5 clients/month because I simply had too much work. Several of those were high profile clients I’d have killed for just a few years earlier.


Of course, I’m no genius (just ask my kids).

This stuff really isn’t all that hard actually.

In fact, I basically just took what other service businesses had been doing for hundreds of years and combined it in a unique way. Something, I’ve never seen anyone else talk about, but based on well-established, tried and true business principles.

So, it’s no big secret.

Or, overly hard to implement.

You just gotta know what it is.

In any case, that’s what I teach in my Beginner’s Guide to Freelance course. And, you can get access to it for nothing over on SkillShare. All the details on the course and how to get no-cost access are here: https://www.johnmorrisonline.com/freelance.

Later,

John

November 30, 2018

Blood-sucking freelancers

Fair warning if you’ve never been told.

It’s important to never get too close to your clients.

It’s a recipe for certain disaster.

Something I learned the hard way…

I had this client once I really liked. When we started, she was super laid back and easy to work with. She wasn’t trying to re-invent the wheel. And, she was actually willing to listen to me and my thoughts on her site.

And, I felt like she really liked me, too.

She always was pleasant when we talked.

Always said nice things.

Even as we worked through a stickier issue with the site, she was great.
Then, one day, she forwarded an email thread from one of her staff members about some question they had.

And, I was tracing back through the thread to get some context…

And, that’s when I saw it.

The most vile, explitive-laced paragraph I’ve ever seen a client write.

Calling me every name in the book…

And, spewing venom like I’d never seen.

It was like a knife to the back.

And, a hard lesson.

It’s amazing how quickly a client will turn from “loving you” to telling everyone they know you’re a “blood-sucker”. It can happen in a heartbeat.

In any case, my solution was simple.

I immediately fired her.

Copied that paragraph, sent it to her and said, “I’m done”.

She begged for forgiveness.

Even tried to hire me, again, several months later.

Apologizing profusely.

But, nope.

No dice.

I refused to let her hire me.

I can forgive, but I don’t forget.

Of course, I could fire her and reject her constant overtures because I had a backlog of clients waiting to hire me. And, I had that backlog because I’d created a system for GETTING those clients.

Makes things a helluva lot easier when you freelance.

And, you don’t gotta “swallow your pride” with s!@#%y clients.

Anyway, I teach you how to build that same system in my Beginner’s Guide to Freelance course. And, you can get access to it for nothing over on SkillShare. All the details on how are here: https://skl.sh/2pOiF5g

Later,

John​​​​​​​

November 28, 2018

I’m an uneducated moron

That’d be the conventional wisdom.

I only have my H.S. diploma.

No college degree.

Certainly no fancy-pants Master’s or doctorate. I’m just a lowly web developer building “boring” web sites for equally boring and uneducated people. To hear the know-it-alls tell it, anyway.

But, as I sit here…

On the land I own free and clear…

Looking at the house I’m building (and own free and clear)…

Pondering all the student loan debt I DON’T have…

I can’t help but think:

“This moron has done pretty damn well for himself.”

Some might call that arrogant. Other (smarter) people might see the lesson in it. Regardless, I think it’s becoming more and more obvious what a raw deal college is. And, specifically, talking about tech…

In my humble, but accurate, opinion…

There’s very few tech jobs that actually require a degree.

Sure, a few here and there.

But, far less than the screechers who will send me hate-mail about this would like you to believe. In most cases… a boot camp, an online course, hell just YouTube somtimes… will not only be cheaper, but give you a better education.

That and you don’t have to worry about all the “safe-spacers”…

And, purple-haired weirdos that tend to populate colleges these days.

In any case, do what you want…

I’m just giving you an alternate perspective.

You can be plenty happy…

And, do more than fine financially…

Without a bunch of letters behind your name.

(And, a bunch of zeroes in your debt column.)

Of course, as you know, MY coding curriculum is available to you for ONE zero… as in… zip, nada, zilch-o. Object-oriented programming, HTML and CSS, JavaScript, PHP, freelancing, Upwork and much more…

The whole shabang for nothing.

All the details on that are right cheer: https://www.johnmorrisonline.com/skillshare

Later,

John

November 26, 2018

I can smell your excuse from here

Once upon a week ago, I got a YouTube comment from a student of mine:

“Really? I made 35k on Upwork in the last 12 months. Seems like a good scam to me :)”

This was in response to the typical loser-screech of the Upwork haters that come out of the woodwork every time I do an Upwork video… calling Upwork a scam or whatever the excuse-word of the day is.

Then, some dingbat responds to her with this doosie:

“35k on Upwork? That’s because you’re a woman, you’re privileged and people pay you more.”

Lol.

The excuse-gerbil is spinning at maximum speed on that one. It sort of reminds me of all the excuses people make about why they can’t become a developer. Not smart enough or not “techie” enough (whatever the hell THAT is).

When, really it’s just about persistence.

And, hard work.

And, a little belief in yourself.

You can whine about everyone else and their “privileges” all you want. At the end of the day, nobody cares and it won’t change anything. You’ll be right where you are. And, they’ll be right where they are.

That or get off your arse and make it happen.

Anyway, for a lot of new freelancers, the problem with Upwork is they just don’t understand how it actually works. That it’s an algorithm-driven platform with very specific goals. And, that despite is “propaganda”, the client is king on Upwork.

But, once you do get that stuff.

Understand what its goals are.

And, how its algorithms work to support those goals.

Tweaking your profile and your bidding strategy to manipulate those algorithms in YOUR favor becomes obvious.

And, Upwork can become your little piggy bank.

Anyway, that’s what I teach you in my freelancing on Upwork course here: https://skl.sh/2EhufQC

But, fair warning… leave your stinky excuses at the door.

Ain’t nobody got no time for that s!@#.

Later,

John​​​​​​​

November 24, 2018

How to ask for a raise as a developer

Don’t just go in and ask.

Have a plan. And make sure your plan includes these three things… I learned from my brother as he went from 40K to over 110K in about 2 years:

Later,

John

November 21, 2018

Do developers need a college degree?

“You don’t need college degree to be a web developer because people with advance college degree create libraries so that people without college degree can get a job.” 

That’s the comment I just got on YouTube.

🙄

Yeah.

Sooo… let’s tear this guy a new… ahem…

I mean, here are my thoughts:

Later,

John

November 19, 2018

How to become a full stack web developer

I don’t hear many developers talk about #4 here.

But, it’s so critical.

If you start your web development career by picking a language, you’re making it much harder on yourself. And, that’s what #4 in this video addresses:

In any case, if you wanna know how to methodically become a full stack web developer, give it a watch. It’s my recommended path to make a lot fewer mis-steps and get there faster.

Later,

John

November 14, 2018

How to become a web developer without a degree

It’s 100% possible.

In fact, I think degrees are mostly worthless for WEB developers.

But, there are three things colleges normally figure out for or dictate to you… that you’ll need to figure out on your own. Otherwise, you’ll wind up wasting a bunch of time and muney learning things you don’t need to.

Or, in ways that don’t suit you.

Anyway, I reveal those three things here:

Watch, like, share.

Later,

John

November 9, 2018

How to start a career in web development

Begin with the end in mind.

After almost 15 years of doing this web development thing, if there were one thing I could go back and tell young Johnny, it’d be to think a helluva lot more about where I wanted to go with all this.

The answers wouldn’t have been perfect.

They’d evolve over time.

But, I’d have felt lost a lot less.

I’d have been more motivated.

And, I’d have wasted a lot less time.

In any case, if you’re smart you’ll learn from my mistakes. This new video has the big ones and the things you need to start your career in web development, be highly successful and do it much faster than I did. Give it a watch:

And, I’d appreciate if you’d share it with any young developers you know.

Later,

John

November 8, 2018

How to get clients for web development

I learned this when my brother got into insurance.

It was all but required for any new insurance agent and the primary way they went about drumming up those first few clients and building the network they’d use to reliably get clients the rest of their career.

Going around with him…

I quickly learned how hot a commodity I was as a web developer.

And, had people asking me to build them websites from day one.

It was easy to see why every insurance agent did this.

Anyway, that’s #4 of the 5 tips I reveal in my latest video on how to get clients for web development. If you wanna get paid to do this, but don’t necessarily wanna work for “the man”… give it a watch:

And, I’d appreciate it if you’d share it with any developers you know.

Later,

John

November 7, 2018

How to become a professional developer

I’ve been a developer for over 14 years.

And, I’ve worked with developers from all over the world.

And, when people ask me “What does it take to be a PRO developer?”… I’ve noticed there are three tell-tale signs. Things you’ll see pro developers that others simply don’t or can’t.

And, if you can do these things…

You can pretty much write your own check as a developer.

Anyway, just uploaded a new video on it here:

If you want to take that next step, give it a watch.

And, I’d appreciate if you’d share it with any other developers you know.

Later,

John

November 6, 2018

Object-oriented programming in PHP

This just can get confusing as hell, sometimes.

I kinda just shake my head at the “Intro to OOP” tutorials that spend the whole time talking about “polymorphism” and “encapsulation”. It’s no wonder a lot of developers hold out learning OOP.

Anyway, the most important…

Most fundamental…

Object-oriented programming principle is much, much simpler.

And, I think a big “aha” for developers.

Of course, that’s probably just my naive “don’t confused the hell out of people on day 1” opinion, but who knows. Anyway, if you’ve been wanting to tackle OOP in PHP, but been afraid it’s complicated as hell…

Give this video a watch:

I think you’ll see… it’s a lot simpler than you think.

(And, most coding instructors make it out to be.)

If you do, I’d appreciate it if you’d share it with anyone you know who is also looking to learn object-oriented programming.

Later,

John

November 5, 2018

The biggest mistakes freelancers make

Man! I’ve made a lot of mistakes in my freelance career. But, each time, I always learned something important that helped me be successful later on.

But, these three.

These three mistakes were the biggest lessons I learned in 14+ years of freelancing. So, I made this video to just tell you what they are and what to do to avoid them. Give it a watch here:

And, I’d appreciate if you’d share it with any freelancers you know.

Later,

John

November 2, 2018

How to learn to code fast

It took my five years to learn PHP. It was my first language and I made a bunch of mistakes. Later, when I decided to learn jQuery, I fixed those mistakes and learned it in about 30 days.

In this video, I reveal what I learned:

If you wanna learn how to code as fast as you possibly can, give it a watch.

I’d appreciate if you’d share it with any developers you know, as well.

Later,

John

November 1, 2018

How to make 100K as a developer

New video just posted for you. In this one… a lot of developers wanna hit that 100K range, but don’t have a plan for how to do it. THIS is how you build that plan to make sure you’re grinding in the right direction. Give it a watch:

And, I’d appreciate if you’d share it with any developers you know.

Later,

John

October 31, 2018

How to start working as a freelancer

FYI. I just uploaded a video with step-by-step instructions on how to start and grow your very own freelance business:

Please share with anyone you know who is interested in freelancing.

Later,

John

October 29, 2018

Advice from a CodeCanyon success story

I got this from Mikhail:

2018-10-25_1142

Another example of how simple this can be.

Your job is to grind.

Mine is to point you in the right direction.

In any case, I’ll keep it short, today. If you wanna become another success story like this… yes, of course, I truly believe in my courses and the fact that they’ll help you get there… and faster.

BUUUUT…

Don’t do what 90% do.

Don’t join up and then do nothing.

GRIIIIIIND!

Hit it hard.

Squeeze very last drop out of it.

THAT is how you win.

Anyway, if you want to know what to do and HOW, jump into my curriculum. You can get access to it for nothing on SkillShare. All the details on that are here: https://www.johnmorrisonline.com/skillshare.

Later,

John

October 25, 2018

I got a few freelance clients, now I’m stuck

This is that turning point I keep bringing up:

2018-10-22_1443

You get a little taste of success.

But, really don’t know how.

Then, all of sudden, it stops.

And, all the fears… all the doubts and insecurities, all the “why me” and “can’t ONE thing just f!@#ing work!?”… the nightmares about being stuck in a 9 to 5 forever, all the people saying, “I told you so”.

You bounce from depressed to pissed to confused…

This is the moment you decide to get serious…

Or, walk away.

THIS is what I mean by building a real business around your freelancing services. KNOWING how you got those clients. KNOWING how to get more. KNOWING you don’t have to worry about that ever again.

So, the solution?

How do you do it?

You saw my answer, right?

THAT is a start.

I’ll keep quoting him until people stop asking me:

“If you’re not producing content online, you basically don’t exist.”

— Gary Vaynerchuk

But, most freelancers will find an excuse not to.

¯\_(ツ)_/¯

What do you do?

Of course, that’s just a start. Freelancers are service providers. And, that industry is well-established. What works is well-established. You don’t have to guess. You don’t have to wonder. You just have to learn it then DO it.

Repeat clients.

Referrals.

Service quality.

On and on down the list… it’s all known.

Anyway, THAT is what I teach you in my new Beginner’s Guide to Freelance course. All the things we KNOW work that most freelancers just simply refuse to do. And, if you do them… long-term, you can’t lose.

So, if you’ve reached that point…

Where it’s time to quit f!@#ing around…

And, time to get serious.

Get started learning what works here: https://skl.sh/2pOiF5g

Later,

John

October 22, 2018

How to get freelance clients when you’re new to freelancing

1000 things you could do here…

But, let me tell you what I actually did.

First… my first several clients all hired me because they’d seen some YouTube videos I did that were pretty close to what they wanted. At the time, I didn’t have a portfolio up, testimonials or even a page selling my services.

They just found my email and emailed me.

This is why I constantly beat the “create content” drum.

It can work when you have nothing else.

Second… all the projects I worked on were small.

Fix a CSS bug here. Write a little PHP script there. Frankly, I wasn’t ready for big projects and I didn’t have the “proof” to justify hiring me for one. But, little scripts and fixes weren’t a big deal.

And, that helped me BUILD my portfolio, etc.

Third… my portfolio.

One thing, I learned quickly is your portfolio is the #1 things clients will look at/ask for. I was able to get work despite not having one, because of my content. But, I’d have landed a lot more jobs if I had one.

So, this is why I developed the “non-client portfolio”.

Build 5-10 websites/applications for nobody.

Purely to put in your portfolio.

Having something in there is better than nothing. They don’t need to be client projects. Clients want to see examples of your work, at a bare minimum. And, just make sure it’s your best work and visually appealing.

So, if I were starting today, here’s what I’d do:

  1. Build a portfolio of non-client sites/apps in 1-2 weeks.
  2. Start creating YouTube videos solving small tech problems.
  3. At the end of every video, point people to my “hire me” page.
  4. Spend 30/month promoting my YouTube videos on Google Ads.

It’s pretty simple actually.

Then, if you want to know how to grow your freelance business from there, that’s what I’ll teach you in my new Beginner’s Guide to Freelance course. And, you can get access to it for nothing over on SkillShare.

All the details on that are here: https://skl.sh/2pOiF5g

Later,

John

October 21, 2018